Monthly Archives: March 2014

Only 2% of Advisors know how to maintain the next generation of clients

From Advisor.ca article “Adapt to Wealthy Client Needs, or else” by Dean Dispalatro October 2013

Mr Dispalatro writes in his article about some wisdom shared by Keith Sjogren, managing director of consulting at Investor Economics including what he outlined as the 3 trends impacting the wealthy. 

  1. Sluggish economic growth resulting in income being depressed and personal wealth not growing
  2. Concentration of wealth in Canada’s is growing steadily. Those with more than $1M in investible assets now control 2/3 of the country’s wealth
  3. Debt reduction is a top priority with the wealthy

All of this leads Sjogren to conclude that the wealthy need more advice; but wealth management advice not investment advice. He also suggests that more attention should be paid to those with high incomes who have not yet accumulated assets of $1M as they probably will as real estate or business interests are sold and inheritances are received 

But he also points out the demographics of wealth at play.  By 2022, more than half of wealthy people will be older than 65. & that demographic is not made up of conspicuous consumers but  capital protectors with a big focus on leaving a legacy for their children. Hence, he concludes that advisors should shift their focus from “accumulation to preservation.”

Indeed the $900 billion that is set to change hands in the next 10 years.at least half will happen in wealthy families, making estate planning a key priority offering. But the issue remains; advisors are not doing an adequate job of getting to know the families of their clients;  which as he says “is a sure-fire way to lose the next generation when wealth changes hands

Investor Economics data backs this concern up.  When assets are transferred to a widowed spouse, only 55% keep the same Advisor.  When assets are transferred to the children, a whopping 98% move to a different Advisor.

Even millionaires are procrastinating

This from a 2010 article ” Wealthy Worry about Next Generation” in Advisor.CA magazine by John Powell 

Referencing a study by RBC Wealth Management of Canadian Millionaires:

  • 58% of millionaires think their children are facing an uphill battle when it comes to managing their finances
  • 49% don’t have confidence in their children’s abilities to manage the inheritance. 
  • 67% feel it is their responsibility to preserve wealth for future generations and leave their children with a healthy legacy,
  • But, 39% have no estate plan to speak of.

Contradictory?
Tom McCullough President/CEO of Northwood Family Office chalks it up to people just being human and not wanting to face what the future might hold for them and their loved ones. 

“Estate planning is complicated. It is about the future. It is about death. They don’t want to have to make those decisions now,” he explains. “I think it is one of the most important things people need to do is to sort through their personal affairs and their estate but there are a lot of folks who don’t do it, don’t get to it or don’t know how to do it.”

Thane Stenner, Founder/Director of wealth management at Stenner Investment Partners, an independent private family office group within Richardson GMP Limited, is not surprised by RBC’s findings as it mirrors the results of his own company’s research from 2006. which highlighted the top concern of the high-net worth clients as being how their children would handle the family finances in the future.

“What is interesting is there still seems to be some procrastination taking place. That is not surprising. Most successful, wealthy families are busy. They have a lot on the go. Estate planning or issues like that are never seen to be urgent and that is one of the reasons why a lot of the times quite candidly, that estate plans are not updated and are not properly papered,” says Stenner